A wooded area south of Kankakee that appears like a tiny island surrounded by an ocean of agricultural fields becomes a respite for the weary travelers during the spring migration.

The trees and understory were alive with a number of species of migrating birds that were taking advantage of the safety of the brushy cover and the good food source of worms and insects that the little woods offered. Some of the birds had selected this spot for the summer and already were nesting in the thicket, and others were resting and feeding for their continued trip north.

Yellow-rumped warblers, in full breeding plumage, were busy searching the tree branches and emerging leaves for insects while in the company of tiny blue-gray gnatcatchers that were extremely animated as they fluttered from branch to branch.

Common yellow-throated warblers were staying among the low branches and shorter vegetation as they appeared and disappeared quickly to and from the waters edge and through the brush. A small least flycatcher was working its way through the branches searching for insects while at times stopping for a rest on a nearby perch.

A northern water thrush, a small hermit thrush, and a cautious ovenbird were using the same territory and could be seen at times moving like a stealth across the ground through the shadows of the bushes and trees. A perched white-eyed vireo was removing the wings from a dead red admiral butterfly, the wing dust and wing parts surrounded the gruesome scene as the beautiful little vireo with impressive white eyes consumed its prey.

Baltimore orioles and rose-breasted grosbeaks flying-about lit up like flickering lights among the softened springtime color tones of the wooded acre. The distant whistles of the male Baltimore oriole were such clear and clean songs that they conjured up a vision of the vibrant colored bird perched and displaying that coal black head and wings contrasted with that beautiful yellow-orange body.

A female and male scarlet tanager were searching the ground for worms and small insects. Scarlet tanagers are long-distance neotropical migrants that nest in the eastern half of United States and all of Illinois. They winter in the tropical rain forests in northern and western South America, east of the Andes and as far south as the lowlands of Bolivia.

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