TRAVEL-FLORIDA (copy)

Kiteboarders compete with birds of prey for space in the sky near Curry Hammock State Park in Florida. When asked where Illinois residents would go, Florida, Indiana, Texas, Tennessee and California were the top five most-cited destinations.

Six in 10 Illinoisans have thought about becoming ex-Illinoisans in the last year, according to a September poll conducted for the University of Illinois at Springfield.

“In 2018, a bit over half (53 percent) of respondents said they had considered moving out of Illinois in the previous 12 months,” the report said. “In 2019, this has risen to slightly more than six in ten (61 percent).”

When asked why, the majority of all respondents said it was “lower state taxes (27 percent), state government policies (17 percent), and better weather (15 percent).”

One striking statistic was the percentage of high-earners who say they’ve considered moving out of state.

Those who earned more were more likely to consider moving out of Illinois.

“Respondents reporting a household income of more than $100,000 a year (68 percent) are nearly ten percentage points higher than other income groups to say they’ve considered moving out of the state,” the report said.

When asked where they would go, Florida, Indiana, Texas, Tennessee and California were the top five most-cited destinations. The top three states were listed as the top destination for both Democrat and Republican respondents.

People who identified themselves as Republicans were more apt to seek out a new home state. Seventy percent of Republicans and what the study labeled “Republican-leaning independents” reported they considered leaving the state.

A majority of left-leaning respondents said they had considered leaving in the last 12 months.

Illinois’ population declined by 45,000 people in the 12 months that ended in July 2018. At that time, Illinois lost its spot as the fifth most populous state in the nation. Pennsylvania took the fifth place spot when Illinois slid into sixth. If the state’s population continues to decline at this pace, the state is due to lose at least one congressional seat – and possibly two seats – after reapportionment in 2021.

Even so, more Illinoisans said they though the state was on the right track after Gov. J.B. Pritzker beat former Gov. Bruce Rauner in the November 2018 election.

“Compared to the 2018 edition of this survey (14 percent), twice as many respondents (28 percent) in 2019 describe Illinois as heading in the right direction,” the report said.

The report also showed growing optimism with Gov. J.B. Pritzker, with 59 percent of voters approving of the way he was handling his job.

The survey polled more than 1,000 Illinoisans 18 or older.

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